Wildlife Photographer Of The Year

The Wildlife Photographer of the Year exhibit, co-owned by BBC Worldwide and the Natural History Museum, is a competition that showcases the best of the best when it comes to nature and wildlife photography. For a second year, the exhibit is being shown at the ROM in Toronto and I made sure to stop by this past weekend before it closes on March 22.

Last years exhibit was pretty spectacular and this years did not disappoint with photographers of all ages and skill levels from around the world showcasing their talents.

Some photos make an impact simply because they are visually stunning and others because they also relay a message, reflect the times we live in or show us where we may be headed. There are too many to mention here, but I will narrow down a few of my favorites starting with the Grand title winner Michael ‘Nick’ Nichols and his ethereal black and white piece The Last Great Picture.

Michael 'Nick' Nichols, USA, Wildlife Photographer of the Year, Natural History Museum, BBC Worldwide, Lions, The Vumbi pride , Tanzania, Serengeti National Park , Lioness, Lion Cubs, Kopje, Rocky Outcrop, Wildlife Photography, Africa, Save Lions, Ban Canned Hunting, Ban Trophy Hunting, Lions are not trophies, Ethical Tourism, Voice for the pride, Big Cats Forever, National Geographic, Save Habitat, Stop Poaching of Lions, Learn to Live with Wildlife, Apex predators,

Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2014, Grand title winner, Black and White, Michael ‘Nick’ Nichols, USA The last great pictureImage © Michael ‘Nick’ Nichols

Taken in Tanzania’s Serengeti National Park, 5 Lionesses part of the Vumbi pride are captured as they lay on a rocky outcrop called a Kopje resting with their cubs, exhausted after having driven off the prides two males.”  What makes this image even more poignant is that it would be the last time he would photograph them all together. A few months later he learned that they had ventured outside the park and that three of the five females had been killed.

Next is Finalist David Lloyd with his photo The enchanted woodland and I have to say the combination of Leopard and Yellow fever tree is captivating. Taken in Kenya’s Lake Nukuru National Park this is a perfectly timed photo of a Leopard looking as if he was just waiting to be photographed.

Among the finalists in the youth category I picked The watchful cheetah by Leon Petrinos ‘You can tell the animal’s feelings from the look in the eye, the way the fur lies and how the ears move,’ says Leon. He particularly likes portraits, he says, because ‘the animal’s feelings talk to you’.

Leon Petrinos, Wildlife Photographer of the Year, Natural History Museum, BBC Worldwide, Maasai Mara National Reserve, Kenya, Wildlife Photography, Africa, Save Cheetahs, Ban Canned Hunting, Ban Trophy Hunting, Cheetahs are not trophies, Ethical Tourism, Cheetahs are not pets, Illegal Wildlife trade, Illegal Pet Trade, Big Cats Forever, National Geographic, Save Habitat, Stop Poaching of Lions, Learn to Live with Wildlife, Apex predators,

Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2014, Finalist, The Watchful Cheetah – Image © Leon Petrinos, Greece

Vanishing lions taken in Kenya’s Maasai Mara National Reserve by Skye Meaker another finalist in the youth category, gives us a picture with a strong message behind it. ‘I want the picture to raise awareness that lions are a vulnerable species,’ he says. ‘To me, this picture conveys the feeling that lions are fading from Africa.’  With fewer than 25,000 Lions estimated to be left across the continent, this young photography doesn’t realize how accurate his statement is.

Special Award: Wildlife Photojournalist of the year went to Brent Stirton from South Africa for his portfolio on how the lives of Lions are linked to humans in Bred to be killed which also highlights the practice of canned hunting. Hopefully having this appalling industry exposed through a mainstream exhibit will show thousands of people why the world has rallied to fight against it.

From the World in Our Hands category one of my all time favorites and finalist, Hollywood Cougar by photographer Steve Winter.

Steve Winter, Cougars, Mountain Lions, Hollywood Hills cougar, North America's Big Cat, National Geographic photographer, Wildlife Photography, LA's elusive wildlife, Urban Wildlife,Wildlife Photographer of the Year, Natural History Museum, BBC Worldwide, Big Cats Forever, National Geographic, Save Habitat, Stop Poaching of Lions, Learn to Live with Wildlife, Apex predators

Finalist 2014, World in our Hands, Steve Winter, USA,  Hollywood Cougar – Image © Steve Winter

For more award-winning images check out the Wildlife Photographer of the Year exhibit online or in person when it comes to your city.

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