In The Eyes

Lions, wildcats, wildlife, wildlife photography, conservation,travel, safari, Botswana

Lion Cub Botswana – Image © Tori-Ellen Dileo

“The eyes of the future are looking back at us and they are praying for us to see beyond our own time. They are kneeling with hands clasped that we might act with restraint, that we might leave room for the life that is destined to come. To protect what is wild is to protect what is gentle. Perhaps the wilderness we fear is the pause between our own heartbeats, the silent space that says we live only by grace. Wilderness lives by this same grace. Wild mercy is in our hands.” – author Terry Tempest Williams

I found this beautiful and inspiring quote on one of my favorite Instagram accounts Trish Carney Photo, a wonderful California based photographer who focuses on wildlife and has captured some of my favorite images of bobcats.

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I Stand with Big Cats

Today, everyday all cats big and small. If you haven’t posted your picture yet please take to Instagram, Facebook, twitter or Snap chat to show your support of our wonderful and wild feline friends. I specifically picked a photo taken a few years ago with P-22 mountain lion in L.A. (not the real one his famous cardboard cut out). While I love (aka am obsessed with all wildcats) it seems that we here in North America forget that mountain lions like all wildcats elsewhere are victims of habitat loss, human population growth, human/wildlife conflict and conflict with livestock. Additionally, they fall prey to outdated myths resulting in heavy persecution from hunting and trapping (even here in Canada). We now know so much more about these mysterious and once very misunderstood cats, but we have a long way to go. Even with ground breaking research like that of Panthera’s Puma Program they continue to be treated/viewed like they were centuries ago. We know better we should be doing better, our ‘big cat’ deserves our respect and protection.

Mountain lions do not receive the protection or even consideration like African lions or most of the other big cats, they are unfortunately considered of “least concern” despite the fact that there numbers overall are declining. What are we waiting for? We cannot protect or save what is not there. While we continue to fight for all wildcats elsewhere we cannot ignore what goes on in our own backyard, we must continue to push for more humane ways to co-exist with them.

‘Lead by example. What better way to show other countries how to live alongside predators?’

Happy #WorldWildlifeDay @pantheracats Today & everyday #IStandWithBigCats . . I have specifically picked this photo taken a few years ago with the most famous mountain lion in the world #p22mountainlion because he represents the struggles that North America's lion is facing. We often forget that just like big cats elsewhere, these 'big cats' are victims of habitat loss, human population growth, human/wildlife conflict & conflict with livestock. Additionally, they fall prey to outdated myths resulting in heavy persecution from hunting & trapping (even here in Canada). We now know so much more about these mysterious & once very misunderstood cats, but we have a long way to go. They deserve our respect & protection . . While we continue to fight for all wildcats elsewhere we cannot ignore what goes on in our own backyard. Vital to healthy ecosystems we must continue to push for more humane ways to co-exist with them . . What better way to show other countries how to live alongside predators than leading by example? . . #PredatorsUnderThreat #WWD2018 #Mountainlions #puma #catamount #cougars #betheirvoice #savelions #apexpredator #leadbyexample #wildlifeconservation #endpoaching #actforcats #BigCats #lovecats #caturday #wildlife #conservation #panthera

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From one of my favorite accounts/photographers, Robert Martinez/Parliament Of Owls comes amazing footage of a mountain lion mom known as Limpy and her three kittens in California – a place that is trying its best to learn how to coexist with North America’s largest cat.

World Wildlife Day

The theme of this years World Wildlife Day, celebrated on March 3, is very special as it focuses on the big cats. While everyday is a celebration of the big cats here at Purr and Roar it is thrilling to see these magnificent, and in most cases highly endangered, species finally get the much needed attention. A vital part of our natural world and embedded in our history, culture, and imagination there is simply nothing that comes close to the big cats, nothing so magical, beautiful or engaging and, whatever you think you will find it hard not to have some sort of opinion on them. If we would like them to be part of our future, and not a distant memory or just some mention in a history book, we must act swiftly and without hesitation to protect them.

World Wildlife Day, Predators Under Threat, I Protect Big Cats, WWD2018, Big cats, Predators, Tigers, Lions, Leopards, Cheetahs, Pumas, Snow leopards, Jaguars, clouded leopards,Endangered Species, Extinction

“Big cats: predators under threat” is a long overdue and serious look at the major pressures that various wildcats are facing across the globe.

The most recognizable species on earth faces many threats like habitat loss, prey loss, poaching, hunting, illegal wildlife trade, conflicts with livestock, conflict with humans, climate change and the growing human population. These threats are so pressing that we have already seen drastic declines in species like African lions, tigers and cheetahs just to name a few. The one thing they all have in common is us – no matter where we live each person now decides, by our actions or lack of, what species lives and what species vanishes.

“In an effort to reach as wide an audience as possible, the expanded definition of big cats is being used, which includes not only lion, tiger, leopard and jaguar — the 4 largest wild cats that can roar – but also cheetah, snow leopard, puma, clouded leopard, etc. Over the past century we have been losing big cats, the planet’s most majestic predators, at an alarming rate. World Wildlife Day 2018 gives us the opportunity to raise awareness about their plight and to galvanize support for the many global and national actions that are underway to save these iconic species. Through World Wildlife Day big cats will generate the level of attention they all deserve to be sure they are with us for generations to come.”

The International Big Cats Film Festival is also being held in New York on March 2 and 3 to coincide with World Wildlife Day celebrations and will highlight the Cheetah, Clouded Leopard, Jaguar, Leopard, Lion, Puma, Snow Leopard and Tiger. The finalist list of films are in six categories: Issues and Solutions, Conservation Heroes, People and Big Cats, Science and Behavior, ​Micro-Movie, and Local Voices. The winners will be revealed at the World Wildlife Day celebration at UN Headquarters in New York City on March 2.​

World Wildlife Day, Predators Under Threat, I Protect Big Cats, WWD2018, Big cats, Predators, Tigers, Lions, Leopards, Cheetahs, Pumas, Snow leopards, Jaguars, clouded leopards,Endangered Species, Extinction

If you can’t be in New York there are many ways to celebrate and show your support by joining an event near you, or participating via social media. There are a whole list of outreach materials available that individuals, countries and organizations can use for free to show support for big cats and help get the message across. The materials are available in different languages and people are encouraged to share them on social media along with facts that are provided in the social media kit with the following hashtags: #WorldWildlifeDay #PredatorsUnderThreat #iProtectBigCats #WWD2018 and #BigCats.

Panthera, the only organization dedicated to the conservation of the worlds 40 wildcat species and their ecosystems, is encouraging everyone to participate by snapping a selfie with the nearest big cat statue, mascot, logo, or other icon and sharing it on social media with the hashtag #IStandWithBigCats.

Wherever you live I hope that you will take the time acknowledge our amazing wild felines  and show your support for them on World Wildlife Day and everyday!

Predators, Dreams, and Extinctions — chasing sabretooths

From one of my favorite blogs, prehistoric cats and beautiful illustrations from paleo-artist Mauricio Antón. I love his work and this piece in particular has an important and timely message!

“Now as you look to the assembly of magnificent carnivorans from the Miocene of Batallones, just imagine your grandchildren facing a similar illustration, but showing the lion, leopard, wolf, lynx, polar bear… by then completely extinct in the wild. Imagine the desolation of knowing that there is nowhere in the world where lions or tigers reign as sabertooths reigned in the distant past. Today those places still exist but if one day they disappear it will be, at least in part, because of our own idleness. Just by having a clear opinion and making it heard, or through our vote, we can make a difference. But trying to convince ourselves that extinction doesn´t matter is perhaps the ultimate sign of cowardice, and thinking that future generations will not be aware enough of their loss to reproach us is the farthest thing from a consolation. We need the fossils in the museums and the living predators out in the wild. Each thing in its place!”

I remember well the first excavations at the fossil site of Batallones-1, over a quarter of a century ago. After some teeth of the saber-tooth cat Promegantereon appeared at the site it seemed likely that, for the first time ever, a complete skull of the mysterious animal could be found. Back then, that possibility excited […]

via Predators, Dreams, and Extinctions — chasing sabretooths

Cat Chat

This post is a first for me, and a little different from others that I have done, as the roles have been reversed. Instead of being the interviewer, I have become the interviewee! I was asked by Carole Baskin of Big Cat Rescue, who I met at the Jackson Hole Conservation Summit, to participate in their Cat Chat series. Carole and I chat about my blog, wild cats, some of the issues facing the species, how to cope when faced with negative or overwhelming news and much more. Please feel free to leave comments below!

Big Cat Rescue, located in Tampa Florida, is one of the largest accredited sanctuaries in the world dedicated to abused and abandoned big cats. Their mission is to provide the best home they can for the cats they care for, to end abuse of big cats in captivity and prevent extinction of big cats in the wild. They are the home to about 80 plus cats including lions, tigers, bobcats, cougars and more.

One of their main goals is to work towards ending the abuse of wild cats by ending the private possession and trade in exotic cats through legislation and education.

If you are a U.S. resident one of the most important things you can do currently is support the The Big Cat Public Safety Act HR1818 which is a is a federal bill that would end the private possession of big cats as pets, end cub petting, and limit exhibitors to those who do not repeatedly violate the law. It bans private ownership and breeding of big cats with limited exemptions. You can make sure this law gets passed by contacting your members of Congress and asking them to champion the bill.

Cat Summit Recap

A few weeks ago I attended the Jackson Hole Conservation Summit and Wildlife Film Festival where the focus was on wild cats. It ran from September 24 – 29 and was an intense and exciting week where biologists, conservationists, researchers, filmmakers and more converged to talk about wild cat conservation. With cat populations around the world in trouble and many facing imminent extinction, it was a timely and much overdue conference on how all stakeholders can work more efficiently to help save some of the worlds most iconic species.

Jackson Hole, Wildlife Film Festival, Conservation Summit, Big Cats, Wild Cats, Jackson Lake Lodge, Grand Teton National Park

The conference was held at the Jackson Lake Lodge in Grand Teton National Park, the main lobby window provided this spectacular and inspiring view

Having captured our imagination wild cats are forever embedded in our psyche and culture. They are both revered and feared, appreciated or exploited for their economic value and persecuted for doing nothing more than existing. Wild cats have the ability to unite or polarize people like no other animal on the planet – it is simply impossible not to have some sort of opinion on them.

Dereck Joubert, Thomas Lovejoy, George Schaller, Dr. Jonathan Baillie,Jackson Hole, Wildlife Film Festival, Conservation Summit, Big Cats, Wild Cats, Jackson Lake Lodge, Grand Teton National Park

Where do We Stand? The first panel discussion and overview on issues surrounding cat conservation

The week-long event touched on many facets of cat conservation with one very important underlying message – time is running out for wild cats everywhere and we must work harder and better to save these magnificent and important predators.

Jackson Hole, Wildlife Film Festival, Conservation Summit, Big Cats, Wild Cats, Jackson Lake Lodge, Grand Teton National Park

Landscapes, Corridors, P-22, Mountain lions, Save LA Cougars,Jackson Hole, Wildlife Film Festival, Conservation Summit, Big Cats, Wild Cats, Jackson Lake Lodge, Grand Teton National Park, Left to Right Rodney Jackson, Dr. Kim Young-Overton, Peter Lindsey, Beth Pratt- Bergstrom, Leandro Silveira, PhD

Landscapes and corridors panel discussion that examined a few important initiatives that are helping to keep wildlife connected to the wild

There was a tremendous amount of information to take in and with such great speakers there could have been an entire week just dedicated to the cat summit. Topics ranged from the general overview of threats facing wild cats, conservation efforts around the world, the illegal wildlife trade, trophy hunting, canned hunting, wildlife corridors, human-wildlife conflict and engaging local communities. Discussions also highlighted some of the important work being done to protect the smaller wild cats, how science and data can work together to help conservation and how storytelling can be used to inspire people to become more involved in conservation.

Jackson Hole, Wildlife Film Festival, Conservation Summit, Big Cats, Wild Cats, Jackson Lake Lodge, Grand Teton National Park

Jackson Hole, Wildlife Film Festival, Conservation Summit, Big Cats, Wild Cats, Jackson Lake Lodge, Grand Teton National Park

Jackson Hole, Wildlife Film Festival, Conservation Summit, Big Cats, Wild Cats, Jackson Lake Lodge, Grand Teton National Park

Carole Baskin, Ian Michler, Will Travers,Brent Stapelkamp, Cecil the lion, Born Free, Blood Lions, Big Cat Rescue,Jackson Hole, Wildlife Film Festival, Conservation Summit, Big Cats, Wild Cats, Jackson Lake Lodge, Grand Teton National Park

Cecil and beyond a discussion of high-profile animal stories in the media

For wildlife and conservation filmmakers this was an extremely important event and the biggest competition to date for the festival, almost 600 films were entered, with awards given out to films in various categories. During the week selected screenings took place throughout the day followed by filmmaker Q&A and, one of my highlights at the end of the festival included the premier screening, which played to standing room only, of Bob Poole’s new film Man Among Cheetah’s for Nat Geo Wild.

It was an exciting week where I learned a lot and met some fascinating people all who have important insights on wild cats and their conservation. In upcoming posts I will be  sharing more on some of the people behind the scenes as well as the projects and research they are currently working on.

Tea-Time with Leopards

Next time you sit down to enjoy a cup of tea, and if it happens to be a tea from India, know there is a very good chance that leopards at one time or another may have inhabited the tea garden where the leaves were harvested. Of course a literal tea-time with leopards is never recommended, but the reality is they are a very common resident of many tea gardens in the country.

Panthera Pardus, Leopards, India, Tea Time, Tea plantations, tea gardens, conservation, habitat loss, big cats, living with wildlife,

A recent study from the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) showed that leopards are partial to tea gardens in north-eastern India, but their presence does not necessarily mean conflicts with people. The study, a collaboration between the WCS, the National Centre for Biological Sciences-India, Foundation of Ecological Research Advocacy and Learning, and the West Bengal Forest Department, was done in highly populated areas that included tea gardens and forested area in the West Bengal state. The approximate 600 km area is part of the “East-Himalayan” biodiversity hot spot which includes small protected areas along with tea gardens, villages and agricultural fields. The study showed that leopards will avoid highly dense populated areas, but are partial to tea gardens as they provide ideal vegetation cover. Out of the four large cats in India which include tigers, lions and snow leopards, the leopard is the most adaptable and able to live in protected forests as well as on the edge of urban areas overlapping with humans.

The study mapped more than a 170 locations where people were injured by leopards and interviewed approximately 90 of those injured between 2009 and 2016. More than 350 leopard-human encounters were reported during this period, with five resulting in human fatalities.” No significant relationship was found between the probability of attack and probability of habitat-use by leopards.  Researchers noted that in the case of a rare attack it was accidental or defensive rather than predatory resulting in only minor injuries. Attacks were also likely to occur during the day, while people were working and in areas where the tea shrubs were shorter, denser and the land was relatively flat. The majority of the attacks happened between January and May when large sections of the gardens were disturbed for maintenance like pruning of tea bushes and irrigation.

Panthera Pardus, Leopards, India, Tea Time, Tea plantations, tea gardens, conservation, habitat loss, big cats, living with wildlife,

Leopard is scavenging on a dead gaur, a species of wild cattle. Credit: Kalyan Varma Image Phys.org

Like elsewhere in the world the study highlights the problems when human dominated spaces are shared with large predators like leopards. It identified particular hotspots of “conflict” and confirmed the importance of testing new methods to reduce human-leopard conflict. An early warning system, like making loud noises, alerting the animals to the presence of humans would provide enough time for them to move away, an approach that has already worked well in other areas.

In Assam, India’s northeast area, tea companies have already begun to implement practices to reduce conflict between humans and elephants, as well as prevent the loss of crops in a non-violent manner. Recognizing that as more habitat is lost due to humans wildlife will continue to seek refuge in the tea gardens and, by using fencing, corridors and specially built tiny reserves it will save the lives of both wildlife and people.

In a place where leopards have become “part of the tea garden habitat” tea estates are embracing policies and taking steps that promote co-existence. Many are certified by the Rainforest Alliance and abide by the Sustainable Agriculture Network which help to ensure that no wild animals were harmed or killed in the tea gardens.